Braintree Roof Thatching Services and Materials Are Of The Highest Quality

There are various types of materials we use in thatching or re-thatching roofs. Whereas a repair could take a day or 2, typically a new roof can take several months to complete.

Depending on the right planning, the correct materials and expert execution of work, it can last for up to 40 years subject to the orientation of the property, the style and shape of the building, such as windows, valleys and of course the pitch of the roof, the steeper the pitch the quicker rainwater is dispersed.


Long Straw Thatch Experts in Braintree

Life expectancy of a Long Straw Roof is up to 30 years. If needed, to help pro-long the life of a Long Straw Thatch, it is commonly in need of re-ridging or repairing every 12 years. This is the threshed crop of winter-sown wheat, mainly threshed by machine, removing the grain, separating it from the straw. Bundled up by a trusser, it’s ready for the Thatcher. The straw needs heaping, dampening and drawing before application to the roof. Long straw, unless sheared, can appear a little bit more shaggy than other thatch materials.


Water Reed (AKA Norfolk Reed)

Life expectancy of a Water Reed Roof is up to 60 years. If needed, to help pro-long the life of a Water Reed Thatch, it is also often in need of re-ridging or repairing every 12 years. Mainly coming from the wetland reed beds of Norfolk, it is also grown in other parts of the UK and Europe – but not in the same quantity as Norfolk! Water Reed requires relatively little preparation other than sorting & grading before application to the roof.


Combed Wheat Reed

Life expectancy of a Combed Wheat Roof is up to 40 years. If needed, to help pro-long the life of a Water Reed Thatch, it is also often in need of re-ridging or repairing every 12 years. Combed Wheat Reed, the raw material, is basically the same as Long Straw except the wheat is passed through a weed comber, removing the grain, any weeds & leaf essentially, leaving the straw unbruised. Following bundling, all the butts are tied at one end, the ears at the other. This helps the thatcher as less preparation is required to the straw before application to the roof.